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Image Credits: The Telegraph 

Yesterday I had another appointment with my audiologist, Louisa at Jefferson University Hospital. This was for the second half of her music research study. It was the exact same test as I took three weeks earlier except this time I was already exposed to the new music settings on my cochlear. I must admit, however, that I NEVER use the music settings. I always just keep my cochlear on program 1 as that has always been comfortable for me, even when listening to music. Plus, switching programs back and forth can be a little annoying.

Despite not actually practicing with the new music program like I was supposed to, I feel that I did much better this time around. The music did seem a lot clearer. I think the pitches were about the same, but that didn’t strike me as being too difficult in the initial test anyway. I noticed a big difference with the melodies. They were still pretty hard, but I could identify some of them and I have a feeling I got a lot more of them right this time around. The instruments were easier to identify as well. I especially found it easy to pick out which one was the guitar and I could tell the difference between the brass instruments and string instruments pretty well.

After I finished the test I had to answer more questions. They were the same as the ones I answered three weeks ago but not as many. It was just to see how things changed since getting the new music program. Things really didn’t change at all for me though.

While I was answering the questions Louisa told me about another cochlear implant research study that Advanced Bionics will be doing at their headquarters in Valencia soon. This one is for implanted individuals who did not lose their residual hearing. You may remember from my previous post from a few months back that when they tested me post-activation, I still had some of my residual hearing. Louisa did a quick test with me again after I finished the research study questions just to make sure nothing’s changed, and sure enough, I still had my residual hearing and it was the same as when they tested me a few months back. Louisa forwarded my information to Advanced Bionics and they may be contacting me soon about the study if they feel I am qualified for it. If I do get in for it they will be flying me to their headquarters in California free of charge. I never been to California before but have always wanted to go, so needless to say I am pretty excited about it all.

Before I left my appointment I also talked to Louisa a little bit about the AquaCase. I told her that I was using it and even recently used it to go swimming, but I was having a little bit of trouble getting used to it. It sounded a little unclear at times and reminded me of how I had to get used to things when I was first activated. She said that was weird and should not be the case. She also asked me if I was using program 5. I completely forgot about program 5! I always just kept it on program 1. She explained that program 5 was designed specifically for the AquaCase. When you wear the AquaCase, the processor sits in the case away from your ear. For this reason, having the mic on in the processor becomes much less important. Instead, it is far more important to have the microphone in the headpiece on. Program 5 turns off the headpiece in the processor and instead amplifies the one in the headpiece.

Later than night when I got home I gave program 5 on the AquaCase a try. I was surprised by how much better I could hear! I wore it to walk to the gym and worked out in the gym with it on and then after I got my shower and my hair was wet, I kept it on. It definitely made for a  more enjoyable walk and a more enjoyable work out. It was really no different than my regular cochlear without the AquaCase. Now I can’t wait to go swimming again!  I can’t believe I missed this all before! That just further goes to show you how intricate, detailed, and complex the cochlear truly can be. It’s an amazing piece of technology capable of doing so much that sometimes it can take a bit to fully learn how to use it to get the most out of it. But when you do learn things it’s almost always extremely beneficial. Even after 6 months, my cochlear implant still continues to amaze me with all it does for me.

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